Figure 3: Estimation of the goal distance without sound

20 Sep 2016
Mice are eager to find the virtual sound source to get the sugar water reward. When the mice get closer to the goal, they increase licking in expectation of the sugar water reward. They increased licking when the sound is on but also when the sound is omitted. This result suggests that mice estimate the goal distance by taking their own movement into account.

In a collaboration of the Neural Computation Unit and the Optical Neuroimaging Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), Dr. Akihiro Funamizu, Prof. Bernd Kuhn, and Prof. Kenji Doya analyzed the brain activity of mice approaching a target under interrupted sensory inputs. During an experiment, mice are eager to find the virtual sound source to get the sugar water reward. When the mice get closer to the goal, they increase licking in expectation of the sugar water reward. They increased licking when the sound is on but also when the sound is omitted. This result suggests that mice estimate the goal distance by taking their own movement into account.

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