14. July 2010 - 10:10
On July 10, 2010, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Promotion Corporation (OIST) and Okinawa People’s Council for the Promotion of OIST co-sponsored a public lecture by Dr. Tim Hunt, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine and member of the OIST Board of Governors.
14. July 2010 - 4:34

On July 10, 2010, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Promotion Corporation (OIST) and Okinawa People’s Council for the Promotion of OIST co-sponsored a public lecture by Dr. Tim Hunt, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine and member of the OIST Board of Governors.  In his lecture, titled “Creative Science ?

29. June 2010 - 12:00
OIST Prof. Hiroaki Kitano has developed a novel field of biological theory that integrates what appear to be two very distant fields of study – biology and modern investment theory – to address some of the mysteries of biology.
10. June 2010 - 4:51

Dr. Takuya Hikima of the Brain Mechanism for Behaviour Unit received a JPS Award for Outstanding Papers for his paper published in Journal of Physiological Sciences.

29. January 2010 - 10:46
An urgent general meeting of the Okinawan People’s Council for the Promotion of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) took place on May 8, 2009 in Naha in light of the delay in parliamentary enactment of the School Corporation of Okinawa Institute of the Science and Technology Act (hereafter the OIST Act).
14. June 2008 - 11:00

As part of satellite activities for the first Group of Eight (G8) Ministerial-Level Meeting on Science and Technology, scheduled for June 15, 2008, in Okinawa, a workshop on environment and energy issues was held on June 14, 2008 at the University of the Ryukyus.

11. March 2008 - 15:00
In a lecture that fell on this year’s Brain Awareness week, Dr. Arbuthnott talked to a group of about 80 students, who are planning to pursue either medical science or pharmacy in a university.
28. February 2008 - 15:00
Dr. Price began her lecture by passing out several samples of live Drosophila to a curious audience of about 60 students, explaining that although all of the samples are biologically categorized as Drosophila, their fly wings are not identical, and that the wings actually have different numbers of veins because of their pattering during development.